Pit Fire Passion

The passion potters possess pertaining to pit fire pottery is a hot topic! The more I work toward this direction the more excitement builds – tempered with the grounding mantra “it’s an experiment” of course.

Here is a great example of awesome pit fire work, found on Facebook, Guarnera Potter – be sure to check out his other pieces on Facebook!


Speaking of Combustables!

Ideas:

  • Banana peel. Orange-ish
  • Coffee grounds. Gray-ish, orange-ish
  • Copper carbonate and salt. Green, red and black
  • Copper, cobalt and iron sulphates. Blue and red colors
  • Copper wire. Most often black – if lucky red or green
  • Ferric chloride. Often used in splashes. Great tones from dark red to light pink
  • Sea weed. Colors depend totally on the type, the amount of salt in it etc.
  • Steel Wool (black patterns)
  • Many different kinds of other organic materials, nuts, leaves etc.

Great webpage and Pottery works: https://robertcomptonpottery.com/index.php/vermont-studio/firing-methods/pit-firing/

Kiln Kilts and Kits

A fun update on all three

Kilns

Excitement builds as bricks lay heavy in my mind.
In a good way.

Building a pit-fire kiln has tickled the daydreaming niches of possibilities.
Almost every day.

This book is hard to find
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But I bought it anyway.

And this Blog
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Inspired me in many ways!

Kilts

Always thought it would be fashionable to wear one of these – especially with the bold colors, strong patterns, with some hanging chains of some kind of functionality and maybe even a throwing axe? LOL


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Kits

Yes, the next step towards converting an electric kiln to a Raku kiln is getting a burner kit. A few options exist, including the:


<a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="http://&lt;!– wp:paragraph –> <p>Yes, the next step towards converting an electric kiln to a Raku kiln is getting a burner kit. A few options exist, such as the Raku Burner Kit from Axner.com/Laguna <br><img class="wp-image-1413" style="width: 150px;" src="https://oneidashark.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/raku_burner_kit.jpg&quot; alt="undefined"></p> undefined
Raku Burner Kit from Axner.com


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Ward Burner B3 Dual Burner System

Next steps for electric kiln to Raku conversion:

  • Remove the wire elements
  • Fill in or patch areas where soft (insulating) brick is thin or missing
  • Drill hole in metal and insulating bricks… maybe at a slight angle so the fire/flames circulate inside the kiln OR keep straight on. Either way it may be important to have an angled soft (insulating) brick to direct the flames to affect more wares
  • Refit the lid with ceramic fiber and/or other do other repairs.
  • Add wheels to the kiln stand
  • Secure the kiln to the kiln stand
  • Create a wooden ramp from the kiln storage area to the outside
  • Bonus: Possibly create a lid-sliding feature to act as a quick storage feature when opening the kiln during a fire
  • *During this time, I’ll start collecting dried organic combustibles, including, but not limited to: newspaper, sawdust, pine needles, and dried leaves. Closer to the firing time I plan to use discarded banana peels too. The great thing about this is to experiment (with care).

Raku note, tidbits and infor:

Blog, tips: https://www.lickinflames.com/raku.html

Overview: CeramicArtsDaily.org https://oneidashark.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/1cbf6-rakufiring2014.pdf

Raku Pottery and Covid-19

Three months! Whoa

We survived the self quarantine. My heart and humility goes out to those who died or knew someone who died of Covid-19. Our lives were turned askew. We went through confusion, fear, depression and ultimately (hopefully) reconnected or connection with God and our higher power and Universe (deep self reflection). We are new survivors!

As states started to reopen in phases I found myself being gifted with kilns, as the universe heard my desire (or I fell in tune with my universal fate/destiny/path) to do some alternative pottery firings! I did purchase some hard refractory bricks.

L&L Kiln

Thank you!

Raku Evolution

Heartfelt pottery creations – that is my basis.

After a recent class at the Clayscapes Pottery studio that focused on Alternative Firing methods I was keen on doing some more Raku, specifically Horsehair pieces.

In the process of getting ready to do my own Raku (a service provided by Clayscapes Pottery) I realized my advancement in Raku pottery research actually expanded to more appreciation for glaze recipes as I noted the ‘Copper Matte‘ options (see below):

Here is a run down of my pre-raku items of note:

  • Clay forms:
    • No thin necks (hard to grasp with the tongs)
    • No tall slender objects (may fall over easily in the ‘reduction’ phase)
    • Lids are fired in the kiln separately so this takes up space on the kiln shelf. Note: Andrew from Clayscapes Pottery says he has a method of firing lids so they don’t crack on the shelf – I’ll keep you updated with this helpful hint
  • Burnishing is fun and meditative (on greenware) & is necessary if applying Terra Sig (for Horsehair prep)
  • Terra Sig Info (courtesy of http://www.pitfire.com/saggar_firing_2.htm#How%20do%20I%20make%20Terra%20Sigillata)
    • How do I make Terra Sigillata?
      • In a 5 gal. bucket put 3 gallons (or roughly 28 pints/28 lbs) of water. 
      • Add 14 lbs. dry clay. Ball Clays works well for white base, RedArt for red. 
      • Add enough sodium silicate, soda ash, Darvan 7, or Calgon to deflocculate (a few tablespoons).
      • Allow to settle. Overnight is average. 
      • Less plastic red clays such as RedArt or fire clay may require only 6-8 hours, while very plastic clays like XX Sagger or OM4 ball may take up to 48 hours.Terra sig is best when the specific gravity if about 1.14. Useful range is 1.1-1.5. Specific gravity is measured by weighting out 100 gms of water, marking the volume, and weighing the same volume of the sig. Divide the weight of the sig by 100. If too thin evaporate. If too thick allow to settle longer. 
        Apply sig to bone dry greenware making careful not to make too many drips, and buff or Burnish to a nice shine.
    • Use “patinas” of 1 gerstley borate + 1 colorant as a thin wash over bisqued sigs, applied and rubbed off. Works well on textured areas. 
      Here are some color suggestions added to 1 cup liquid sig: 
      white = + 1 tsp. Zircopax or tin. 
      off white = + 1 tsp. titanium diox. 
      green = + tsp. chrome oxide 
      blue = + tsp. cobalt carb. 
      black = + 1 tsp. black stain 
      purple = + 1 tsp. crocus martis
  • Terra Sig Recipe (courtesy of http://mauipotter.com/article_pit_firing.html)
    • Recipe
      • 115 grams Red Art Clay (powder) or Grolleg White Clay
      • 2 cups water
      • one drop defocculant (darvon or calgon)
      • *optional we added a small amount of red iron oxide to each recipe for color
  • Bisque Fire
  • Horsehair or Glaze
    • Horsehair – thicker hair is better. Good to have a friend with horses. Being grateful for this helps add another dimension of “Heartfelt Pottery”.
    • Glaze
      • Glazing the inside – Question: is this feasible? If so, is this solely to help retain liquids? Otherwise I’d think I won’t use interior glaze as the Raku technique produces a porous piece (i.e. not ‘functional’). Most of the pieces I am looking to create are to serve as a storage container for things that don’t need air-tightness or fluid retention. Talking about this with a potential customer is a must!
      • Copper Matte – ooooh nice, and then sealing undefined
  • Raku Kiln Firing
    • Making an adequate number of pieces is important to me – I don’t want to create too little and waste time at the kiln or my money spent renting the kiln firing. I guess making too much isn’t a bad thing as I could always do another firing!
      1. The kiln shelf is 18″ (254.5 square inches), so 1/4 area of the shelf is 9″ x 9″ x ?? – however I think I could fit 2 max 5″ wide pieces w/their lids, in each 1/4 panel area without overcrowding (and without making the maneuvering with the tongs a challenge). The total for the shelf would then be 4 lidded piece + 1 piece without a lid place in the center, for a total of 5 pieces per load. And since the minimum # of load is 2 per firing, then we’re looking at a max of 10.
      2. One way to find out is draw or print out an 18″ circle.
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    • Working with the Raku Kiln firing facilitator about the choreography of us ‘dancing’ around & doing steps so we don’t bump into each other or let a pot not get the horsehair or reduction treatment in a timely temperature fashion.
    • Equipment:
      • Heat-resistant gloves
      • Scrub Brush to clean pieces after the firing
      • Clothes: Long sleeved shirt, closed-toe footwear, no polyester clothing
      • Horsehair
        • Tongs
        • Pan with Sand – to lay horsehair down and roll the piece (if desired)
      • Regular Raku
        • Combustibles? I don’t know yet if I need to bring my own Sawdust and newspaper, which are popular combustibles
        • Sealant to help keep the colors from fading, after cleaning pieces

DIY Making A Raku Kiln – courtesy of The Ceramic School

Great webpage with an overview of Raku: https://www.rakudays.co.uk/tips-for-raku

The 7 Tools You’ll Need You’ll Need for Raku Firing

Wood-fire & Raku Pottery

It’s so heartwarming to me that my heart warms when I think of the whole process of creating wood-fired pottery. In addition, I’ve tasked myself with doing some RAKU pottery, mainly because of the mystery of the results, experience from a recent alternate-firing class at Clayscapes Pottery, but also because a cool friend gave me some horsehair so I could do some Horsehair pottery!


Horsehair Raku Pottery Inspirations


It’s 2020 and life threw me some lemons, so I’ve been making lemonade but my mind daydreams often of making pottery.

See the source image

Raku Pottery Kiln

The first few months of this year has been focused on PREPARING to do a RAKU session – figuring out how many pieces to make to maximize the my first full raku session (2 kiln firings), then creating, burnishing, bisquing, etc. During this time doing research on the RAKU process and options – what materials to purchase (tongs, gloves, sand, turnstyle, glazes, etc), what glaze options for non-horsehair pieces, getting feathers, etc. During this time also thinking of learning enough to try doing my own RAKU with a DIY kiln or outright purchase of a RAKU kiln. Time will tell.

UPDATE! 07/01/2020

A friend gifted me with an old electric kiln. I plan to convert to a Raku kiln! Grateful and honored be I ❤

Currently I purchased a burner, a pyrometer, ceramic fiber board (to be used with the deteriorating lid, maybe), a drill bit to make a burner hole. Next is to remove the elements, fill in any soft firebrick gaps, make holes (burner, flue) and buy a couple propane tanks and fuel.

Next is to build a small wood ramp to get the kiln outside and then fashion a sandpit area where I will do the reduction using upside down metal cans!

Upside Down Cans via Artifacts By Design

Of course I’ll have the usual trash can with combustible materials on hand to give that a try too!

Ammunition Cases with Wood Shavings via Upwey Potters

Raku firing - covering the pottery pieces in sawdust and paper and a can.
Ceramics: It’s Just Dirt


Wood-fired Pottery Musing

The next phase of my daydreaming is creating pieces for this year’s woodfiring! I love doing mugs and lidded jars for this. 30 pieces is a goal, 40 pieces is a bonus, and 50 pieces would be a hoot!

  • Nice web posting regarding the wood-fire process, the basics, the job duties, the spirit of, etc: Monroe Clay Works

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So while I drink lemonade from life’s lemons I allow myself to giggle inside like a little kid, at the thoughts of doing these 2 kiln firings: RAKU and Woodfire.


Right now I won’t over analyze why I have giggle-ness, I’m just allowing myself to enjoy it.


See the source image
https://pin.it/6f8YDJh

Horsehair Raku Pottery #Appreciation visit @Oneidasharkpottery

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Calling all Potters!

The Clayscapes Pottery Market is accepting applications for their event that will be held in October 2020 near Syracuse, NY.

Clayscapes Pottery is doing it again!

If you’re a potter you may want to consider submitting an application to Clayscapes Pottery by the deadline of April 30, 2020.

  • Where: Dewitt, NY – near Syracuse, NY
  • When: October 3, 2020 – October 4, 2020

Lid Tips

Have a resource for quick reference always helps, especially as time becomes more valuable, retention becomes less and less, or you need to share what you’ve learned.

Making lids for pottery jars and containers can demand more attention – some break, some aren’t sized well enough, some don’t pair just right, etc. So tips and resources are well appreciated, regardless.

Tip #1: Make 2 Lids per container

Tip #2: Size and Resize

Tip #3: Measure, Trim, Measure again

Lid Resources

Patterns

I had an idea using pattern overlays with different glazes per layer. Still in development. A little more simple pattern than below yet effect could be more complicated due to the different glaze affect.

Stay tuned for more!